Wednesday, October 31, 2007

 

EMPLOYMENT: Young Social Scientist (World Bank)

The World Bank’s Research Department is one of the world’s leading centers for research on economic development (http://econ.worldbank.org/research). It aims to conduct fundamental and relevant research published in refereed academic journals, generate new knowledge and ideas about effective policy interventions, and provide policy and strategic advice to the World Bank’s operational staff. Although the department is primarily staffed by economists, it works on a broad range of issues beyond the traditional focus of development economics, including community development, culture, governance, comparative and international politics, networks and social capital, and other issues that are informed by disciplinary perspectives drawn from anthropology, law, political science, psychology and sociology.

To expand the group's capacity in these realms, they are hiring a “Young Social Scientist”: a recent PhD in one of the non-economic social sciences whose research demonstrates significant promise in understanding questions that relate to the problems of development. They are looking for a world-class researcher with excellent skills in qualitative methods, and with significant field experience in one or more developing countries. The ideal candidate should also be familiar with quantitative methods and be willing to interact and collaborate closely with development economists. S/he should be willing to engage closely and critically with issues that are centrally related to development policy. The position offers a very competitive salary and benefits.

Please send a cover letter describing your research and why this position if of interest, and a CV with the names of three references to: research@worldbank.org. At this stage candidates are requested to not send any more material. Candidates selected for the short-list will be requested to submit a more detailed application with writing samples, reference letters, etc. at a later stage. Deadline: December 15, 2007.

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