Thursday, November 21, 2013

 

This Week’s Posts

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Water, Energy and Climate Conference 2014. The IWA Water, Energy and Climate Conference 2014: Solutions for Future Water Security (IWA WEC) is an opportunity to bring together knowledge from across the globe to share experiences and information, enable collaboration and build new partnerships. Deadline: November 30, 2013

CALL FOR PAPERS: Natural Resources Forum Special Issue on Oceans. Natural Resources Forum, A United Nations Sustainable Development Journal, is producing a special issue on oceans. Deadline: December 31, 2013

EMPLOYMENT: IWMI Research Coordinator (Colombo, Sri Lanka). The CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems led by the International Water Management Institute, explores and supports a paradigm shift in sustainable intensification of agricultural production systems through placing natural resources at the forefront of production systems. Deadline: December 31, 2013 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS: Australia Awards for Africa. Australia Awards funds qualified African candidates for masters studies in Australia in subjects of agriculture and food security; health; natural resource management; public policy; and water and sanitation. Deadline: December 13, 2013

FELLOWSHIP: 2014 Vavilov-Frankel Fellowship. The Fellowship enables outstanding scientists from developing countries to carry out research on the conservation and use of agricultural and forest biodiversity. Deadline: December 15, 2013

PUBLICATION: Realizing Women's Rights to Land and Other Productive Resources. A new publication from UN Women and OHCHR.

PUBLICATION: Scoping Study of Good Practices for Strengthening Women’s Inclusion in Forest and Other Natural Resource Management Sectors. A report examining specific challenges and barriers that prevent the inclusion of women and the integration of gender perspectives in REDD+ in the Asia-Pacific region.

PUBLICATION: Foreign aid and sustainable forestry. A UNU-WIDER Working Paper by Pekka E. Kauppi.

 

PUBLICATION: Realizing Women's Rights to Land and Other Productive Resources

A new publication from UN Women and OHCHR:

The purpose of this publication is to provide detailed guidance to support the adoption and effective implementation of laws, policies and programmes to respect, protect and fulfil women’s rights to land and other productive resources.  It presents an overview of international and regional legal and policy instruments recognizing women’s rights to land and other productive resources, and discusses ways of advancing a human rights-based approach to women’s rights to land and other productive resources.  It sets out recommendations in a range of areas accompanied by explanatory commentaries and good practice examples and case studies from countries. The publication is based on the results of an expert group meeting held in June 2012.  It is hoped that the publication will be a useful tool for policy makers, civil society organizations and other stakeholders  in their efforts to realize women’s rights to land other productive resources.

Available here.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

 

PUBLICATION: Scoping Study of Good Practices for Strengthening Women’s Inclusion in Forest and Other Natural Resource Management Sectors

A report examining specific challenges and barriers that prevent the inclusion of women and the integration of gender perspectives in REDD+ in the Asia-Pacific region has been released:

Women Organizing for Change in Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (WOCAN), The United Nations Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in developing countries (UN-REDD) Programme, and the USAID-funded Lowering Emissions in Asia’s Forests (LEAF) program initiated a Joint Initiative in 2012 in response to the need to identify practical entry points for women’s inclusion in Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+). Although there has been a growing recognition of the importance of gender equality in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) meetings since Bali, there remains a limited amount of positive action in determining methods to materialize the goals currently in the process of development at the international level. The aim of this scoping report, therefore, is to examine the diversity of good practices within the forest and other land-use sectors on women’s inclusion with a view to draw out key enabling conditions that have facilitated women to participate and benefit from policies, institutions and practices −both formal and informal at all levels.

These practices are organized into those identified as government policies, institutional policies or practices of government departments, NGOs, local authorities or private companies, and those developed by communities themselves. Through the scoping study, ten such enabling factors or interventions were identified. These offer insights and practical interventions for ensuring effective women’s inclusion in REDD+ initiatives. The scoping report primarily covers experiences from within Asia, but also includes additional exemplary cases from outside the region.
Specifically, this report provides a basis upon which multi-sectorial- stakeholder dialogues and workshops in three selected countries (Cambodia, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka) will be the next step of the Joint Initiative. The dialogues aim to stimulate reflection on the reasons behind the persistence of women’s exclusion from the forest sector; the subsequent workshops with policy makers aim to develop country-level action plans for creating effective women’s inclusion in REDD+ initiatives.

The aim of this Scoping Study, identifying the enabling factors, and the subsequent dialogues is to provide those actors responsible for REDD+ design and implementation with suggestions for practical entry points, and to generate national and global attention to the need for these actions. By doing so, the Joint Initiative hopes to contribute to steps that reverse the historic exclusion of women in the forest sector, and ultimately to improve the overall effectiveness of REDD+.

Full report available here (pdf).

 

PUBLICATION: Foreign aid and sustainable forestry

A UNU-WIDER Working Paper by Pekka E. Kauppi.

Foreign aid can contribute to sustainable forestry in many ways. The goal is to secure forest benefits of the future, without compromising the needs of the present generations. This paper elaborates on forestry aid as it has evolved in the past. Future directions are suggested, referring to short and midterm projects, as well as long-term programmes. Tree planting has worked in the past, and is an option for scaling up the activity in the future. Distributing fuel efficient cooking stoves could work in a similar way, sparing trees and at the same time improving the quality of rural life. Planted trees and new stoves can be made available in the near term, that is, within a time horizon of one to five years. In the mid-term, over a time span of 5-15 years, forest inventory and monitoring systems are relevant candidates for successful foreign aid in forestry, although the methods are not yet sufficiently developed to become applied in tropical rain forests. The support of universities and the infrastructure for higher education in forestry, agriculture, and rural development, is important in the long term. Forestry, which generally operates in remote rural areas, is susceptible to logistical problems and resource misuse. It is important in forestry aid to circumvent corruption risks of both in recipient nations and in donor organizations. Forestry aid must emphasize domestic action by local experts, as well as capacity building in the recipient countries.

Available here.

 

EMPLOYMENT: IWMI Research Coordinator (Colombo, Sri Lanka)

The CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE), led by the International Water Management Institute (IWMI), explores and supports a paradigm shift in sustainable intensification of agricultural production systems through placing natural resources at the forefront of our production systems. WLE is organized into five Strategic Research Portfolios (SRPs), namely Irrigated systems, Rainfed systems, Resource recovery and reuse, River basins and Information systems. In addition to the five SRPs, WLE has established two crosscutting themes that will influence and enhance its research: i) Ecosystem services and resilience, and ii) Gender, poverty and institutions.

The research efforts of WLE will primarily be concentrated in four priority focal regions (Nile, Niger/Volta, Indus/Ganges and Greater Mekong), each with their own regional representation structures which will report to the Research coordinator on behalf of the WLE Management Committee, and four further regions (Andes/Central America, Limpopo/Zambezi, Tigris/Euphrates and Amu Darya/Syr Darya) where research activities relevant to the program are
undertaken at a lower intensity.

The Research Coordinator will have overall responsibility for assisting in the development, implementation and coordination of the research-for-development agenda of WLE, ensuring that the research programs in each of the regions have clearly identified pathways to achieve impact that are in line with WLE’s vision and strategy.

More information (pdf).

Deadline: December 31, 2013

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS: Australia Awards for Africa

Australia Awards funds qualified African candidates for masters studies in Australia in subjects of agriculture and food security; health; natural resource management; public policy; and water and sanitation. Additionally, the program offers short-term fellowships for professional training in Africa and/or Australia in agriculture, mining, and several other thematic areas.

Award types include:

More information.

Deadline: December 13, 2013 (master’s scholarships), January 17, 2014 (professional fellowships)

 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Water, Energy and Climate Conference 2014

The IWA Water, Energy and Climate Conference 2014: Solutions for Future Water Security (IWA WEC) is an opportunity to bring together knowledge from across the globe to share experiences and information, enable collaboration and build new partnerships. The event combines multiple technical sessions with workshops, panel debates, discussion groups, technical tours, Young Water Professional sessions and industry interaction. The event will bring together expertise from across the water cycle from research to practical application to policy and regulation.

The overarching goal of IWA’s WEC Conference is to identify, showcase and debate practical experiences and examples of how cities, industries and farmers can achieve Water – Energy neutrality, reduce their water related carbon footprint and improve their water security. The overall theme of the 2014 IWA WEC Conference is “Solutions for Future Water Security”

More information (pdf).

Deadline: November 30, 2013

Monday, November 18, 2013

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Natural Resources Forum Special Issue on Oceans

Natural Resources Forum, A United Nations Sustainable Development Journal, is producing a special issue on oceans.

Oceans are the primary regulator of the global climate and are contributing to poverty eradication, sustained economic growth, food security, creation of sustainable livelihoods and decent work. They are a critical source of livelihoods and an important element of identity for the people of many countries, including small island developing States. In order to promote understanding and global awareness of critical Oceans issues and to contribute to intergovernmental discussions on the thematic issue of oceans and its various aspects within the sustainable development context, Natural Resources Forum, a United Nations Sustainable Development Journal calls for papers for a Special Issue on Oceans to be published in 2014.

Articles submitted for this special issue should be relevant to policymaking and focus on applied research and/or case studies. The editorial team will give priority to articles that adopt a sustainable development perspective, i.e. one that considers multiple dimensions (e.g., economic, social, environmental, intergenerational) of problems in an integrated way. Topics of interest include:

  • Conservation and sustainable use of the oceans and seas and of their resources. Application of an ecosystem approach and the precautionary approach in the management of activities having an impact on the marine environment; case studies on restoring fish stocks; science-based management plans, including reduction or suspension of fishing catch and fishing effort; management of by-catch, discards and other adverse ecosystem impacts from fisheries, including attempts to eliminate destructive fishing practices; attempts to eliminate, prevent and combat IUU fishing and to eliminate subsidies that contribute to IUU fishing and overcapacity; area-based conservation measures, including marine protected areas;
  • Reducing the incidence and impacts of marine pollution, including marine debris, especially plastic, persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals and nitrogen-based compounds, from a number of marine and land-based sources; resulting best practices for taking action to achieve, based on collected scientific data, significant reductions in marine debris to prevent harm to coastal and marine environment;
  • Prevention of the introduction of alien invasive species and management of their adverse environmental impacts;
  • Ocean acidification and the impacts of climate change. Case studies and/or policy measures that seek to: accelerate the reduction of global greenhouse gas emissions; prevent further ocean acidification; adapt to climate change; enhance the resilience of marine ecosystems and coastal communities; reduce disaster risk and build resilience to natural disasters.

Articles should contain original material and should be between 6,000 and 8,000 words in length.

More information.

Deadline: December 31, 2013

 

FELLOWSHIP: 2014 Vavilov-Frankel Fellowship

The Vavilov-Frankel Fellowship enables outstanding scientists from developing countries to carry out research on the conservation and use of agricultural and forest biodiversity. The research involves collaboration with an academic institution outside of the fellows’ home countries. To date, 41 scientists from 25 countries from all regions of the world have received the Fellowship.

Bioversity International is inviting applications for research on grain species relevant to both Australia and the applicant’s home country. The fellowship, up to US$ 20,000 for a research project of up to 12 months duration, is supported by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC), Australia.

More information.

Deadline: December 15, 2013

Thursday, November 14, 2013

 

This Week’s Posts

EMPLOYMENT: Livelihoods and Land Use Change in Mozambique. ACES (Abrupt Changes in Ecosystem Services and Wellbeing in Mozambican Woodlands?) is a research project that involves scientists and practitioners from Mozambique, the UK, Sweden, Zimbabwe and Brazil working to understand how the livelihoods of rural people in the miombo woodlands of Mozambique change as the landscape is converted from woodlands to agriculture. Deadline: December 2nd

EMPLOYMENT: University of Göttingen Doctoral Researchers in Agricultural/Development Economics. The University of Göttingen has position openings for 12 Doctoral Researchers in Agricultural / Development Economics to join the Research Training Group “Transformation of Global Agri-Food Systems”. Deadline: December 15, 2013

EMPLOYMENT: UIUC Assistant/Associate Professor in Human Dimensions of the Environment. The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) is seeking qualified applicants for a tenure-track faculty position as Assistant or Associate Professor in human dimensions of the environment. Deadline: December 16, 2013

FELLOWSHIP: Postdoctoral Fellow, Forests, Trees, and Agroforestry. The Forests, Trees, and Agroforestry program of the CGIAR and the International Forestry Resources and Institutions (IFRI) Network at the University of Michigan are jointly searching for a postdoctoral fellow for a 1- to 2-year appointment to assist in the development, enhancement, and analysis of socio-economic and forest datasets. Deadline: December 10, 2013

TRAINING: STEPS Centre Summer School 2014. The UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Social, Technological and Environmental Pathways to Sustainability Centre (STEPS Centre) at the University of Sussex announces a two-week international summer school on Pathways to Sustainability. Deadline: January 30, 2014

PUBLICATION: Village Land Use Planning in Rangelands in Tanzania: Good Practice and Lessons Learned. An Issue Paper released as part of the series Making Rangelands Secure, a learning initiative supported by ILC, IFAD, RECONCILE, IUCN-WISP and Procasur.

PUBLICATION: Land, Environment and Climate: Contributing to the Global Public Good. A UNU-WIDER Working Paper by Thomas W. Hertel.

VIDEO: Gender in Southeast Asia: A Review of Swidden Systems. A video in which Dr. Carol Colfer  of the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) discusses her work synthesizing the gender information contained in 120 papers focused on swidden-fallow systems (or shifting cultivation systems).

 

PUBLICATION: Village Land Use Planning in Rangelands in Tanzania: Good Practice and Lessons Learned

An Issue Paper released as part of the series Making Rangelands Secure, a learning initiative supported by ILC, IFAD, RECONCILE, IUCN-WISP and Procasur.

This document, developed by the Sustainable Rangeland Management Project (SRMP), seeks to suggest improvements to the village land use planning (VLUP) process in order to better contribute to sustainable rangeland management. It brings together experience from different organisations and government departments working on VLUP in rangelands areas of Tanzania, as well as relevant lessons from other contexts.

. . .

This report concludes with a summary of lessons learned to date and recommendations based on these for further action to improve VLUP in rangelands. Lessons learned include the following:

  • Pastoral and hunter-gatherer production are valuable land use systems that should not be lost, though they provide particular challenges for planning.
  • Despite decentralisation of land access and management, government at all levels can be reluctant to relinquish control of land to local communities.
  • LUP should not be considered a stand-alone activity but must be part of broader development planning.
  • There are opportunities within current legislation to further strengthen the rights of rangeland users to their land and resources.
  • The building of good governance at different levels is essential, though identifying the most appropriate governance systems for rangelands is challenging.
  • VLUP should not stop with the development of the plan itself, but requires ongoing investment of time and resources.
  • There are limited resources available for VLUP but completion of the process is necessary to ensure security of tenure and effective management plans.

Recommendations include the following:

  • Identify and develop broader development priorities and plans with communities, taking into account the importance of land security and LUP. Community action plans (CAPs) can provide communities with a framework that can stimulate immediate action on top priorities.
  • Simplify documents required in LUP processes as appropriate and provide them in local languages, and carry out awareness-raising and training. The training of VLWs or paralegals is also useful.
  • Ensure that all groups are involved in VLUP activities and the development of related by-laws. Particular attention should be provided to women and youth.
  • Support the development of good governance institutions and structures at different levels.
  • Advocate for greater voice and participation in decision-making processes for pastoralists and hunter-gatherers.
  • Invest adequate time and resources in the resolution of boundary and other conflicts, particularly those that are deeply rooted and complex. All staff should be trained in conflict resolution.
  • Take steps to collect as much information as possible before the start of the VLUP exercise, in order to save costs and improve efficiency. Community mapping of rangeland resources and scenario planning are particularly useful tools, as are GIS and satellite imagery.
  • Take steps to ensure that women fully understand their land rights, as part of a wider programme of empowerment and of broader development processes.
  • Assist pastoral groups to register customary titles to grazing land through current legislation as a CCRO.
  • Assist villages to develop joint resource management sector plans, and districts to develop DLUPs.
  • Assist communities to develop mechanisms for protecting livestock corridors, and carry out VLUP with adjoining villages to consider resource management and protection on a larger scale.

The full paper is available here.

 

EMPLOYMENT: Livelihoods and Land Use Change in Mozambique (ACES)

ACES (Abrupt Changes in Ecosystem Services and Wellbeing in Mozambican Woodlands?) is a research project funded by ESPA . It involves scientists and practitioners from Mozambique, the UK, Sweden, Zimbabwe and Brazil. They are working to understand how the livelihoods of rural people in the miombo woodlands of Mozambique change as the landscape is converted from woodlands to agriculture.

They are now seeking to appoint 3 new team members who will be based mainly in Mozambique:

More information.

Deadline: December 2nd (Impact Fellow) and December 6th (PDRAs)

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

 

TRAINING: STEPS Centre Summer School 2014

The UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Social, Technological and Environmental Pathways to Sustainability Centre (STEPS Centre) at the University of Sussex announces a two-week international summer school on Pathways to Sustainability. Involving innovative forms of teaching and interaction, including an international team of leading researchers in this field, the Summer School will be held from 12-23 May 2014 in Brighton, UK.

Applications are invited from highly-motivated doctoral and postdoctoral researchers or those with equivalent experience, working in fields around development studies, science and technology studies, innovation and policy studies, and across agricultural, health, water or energy issues. There is a premium on interdisciplinary approaches and on interests and orientations that converge with work of the STEPS Centre. Numbers are limited, so recruitment will be by refereed selection. Participants will be required to pay a fee, but a number of scholarships are available.

More information.

Deadline: January 30, 2014

 

FELLOWSHIP: Postdoctoral Fellow, Forests, Trees, and Agroforestry (CGIAR and IFRI/University of Michigan)

The Forests, Trees, and Agroforestry program of the CGIAR (CRP 6) and the International Forestry Resources and Institutions (IFRI) Network at the University of Michigan are jointly searching for a postdoctoral fellow for a 1- to 2-year appointment to assist in the development, enhancement, and analysis of socio-economic and forest datasets. The work of the postdoctoral fellow will contribute to comparative analyses of the links between livelihoods, food security, and tree cover from the local and site to the global and landscape scales.

The fellow will work in an interdisciplinary and multi-cultural environment under the guidance of senior researchers in CRP 6 and IFRI, and will:

  1. help integrate data from site-based research with publicly available global datasets on land cover, demographic changes, topography and so forth;
  2. participate in training and capacity-building workshops;
  3. be involved in discussions on comparative research and methodologies within CRP6 and IFRI; and
  4. work on internationally peer-reviewed and other publications and on their presentation at workshops and meetings.

Desired skills:

  • PhD in behavioral science, quantitative sociology, human geography or interdisciplinary fields such as coupled natural and human systems or environmental/ecological economics;
  • Strong background in survey design, measurement theory, evaluation, index construction, qualitative data analysis, and livelihood assessment
  • Familiarity with use of economic and spatial data and datasets, including panel data;
  • Operating knowledge and experience with modeling techniques and econometrics, and advanced knowledge of the R statistical environment;
  • Strong interpersonal communication and good personal organization skills required;
  • Strong communication skills in written and spoken English; knowledge of another UN language is a plus;

Start date:

We will begin reviewing applications from December 10 with the expectation to start the appointment as soon as possible in 2014.

Location of the assignment:

The selected fellow will be located at the University of Michigan and will participate in regular skype meetings with researchers in CRP6 and will be expected to travel to Nairobi/Bogor for two to three extended in-person meetings with colleagues.

Remuneration

The selected fellow will receive a competitive salary and benefits package based on remuneration of postdoctoral fellows at the University of Michigan, together with support for travel and participation in workshops and professional meetings.

Application process:

Please send your most recent CV, names of three referees, and a cover letter to ifri@umich.edu before December 10.

Deadline: December 10, 2013

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

 

VIDEO: Gender in Southeast Asia: A Review of Swidden Systems

In the video below, Dr. Carol Colfer  of the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) discusses her work synthesizing the gender information contained in 120 papers focused on swidden-fallow systems (or shifting cultivation systems).

 

PUBLICATION: Land, Environment and Climate: Contributing to the Global Public Good

A UNU-WIDER Working Paper by Thomas W. Hertel:

This paper discusses global public goods related to the world’s land resources, their current provision and likely future provision, their potential impacts on the world’s poorest households, as well as prospects for using foreign assistance to enhance these outcomes. Specifically, the paper discusses: carbon sequestration, the provision of biodiversity and ecosystem services, water management, and investments in research, policies, and institutions to facilitate adaptation to climate change. Within this context, access to geospatial analysis tools and information on climate, land use and tenure, poverty and environmental indicators will become increasingly valuable to both public and private decision makers.

Available here.

Monday, November 11, 2013

 

EMPLOYMENT: University of Göttingen Doctoral Researchers in Agricultural/Development Economics

The University of Göttingen has position openings for 12 Doctoral Researchers in Agricultural / Development Economics
to join the Research Training Group (RTG) 1666 “Transformation of Global Agri-Food Systems” (GlobalFood) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The positions are available from April 2014.

The GlobalFood RTG carries out research on restructuring agricultural markets, including the growing role of international food standards, changing consumer preferences, and the rapid expansion of supermarkets. Projects analyze the implications for supply chain governance, international trade flows, market efficiency, and impacts on rural poverty, food security, and nutrition in developing countries. In terms of methodologies, innovative econometric and experimental economics approaches are used. The research and training activities are carried out in cooperation with the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington DC. The doctoral researcher positions are based in Göttingen (Germany), but will require international travel for data collection and exchange with collaborators.

More information.

Deadline: December 15, 2013

 

EMPLOYMENT: UIUC Assistant/Associate Professor in Human Dimensions of the Environment

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) is seeking qualified applicants for a tenure-track faculty position as Assistant or Associate Professor in human dimensions of the environment. Individuals with expertise in applying theories, concepts, and methods from the social and behavioral sciences to the study of environmental and natural resource issues and policies are encouraged to apply. This is a 9-month, full-time position, reflecting a 65% research / 35% teaching appointment. 

NRES has 23 tenure-system faculty with expertise in teaching, research, and outreach in the biological, physical, and social sciences. This expertise has been applied in natural, agricultural, and urban ecosystems (http://nres.illinois.edu/). Interdisciplinarity is a key element of our research and educational programs.

Responsibilities:  Preference will be given to candidates with demonstrated potential for conducting collaborative research that is grounded in theory and application, and with a strong commitment to excellence in teaching and advising. The individual in this position will be expected to recruit and train graduate students, teach and advise at the undergraduate and graduate levels, develop grant proposals, attract funding, and publish regularly in leading peer-reviewed scientific journals. Applicants at the associate level must demonstrate a strong track record of obtaining grants and of leadership in interdisciplinary collaboration.

Qualifications:  A Ph.D. and substantive research in the social sciences is required. Potential disciplines include sociology, geography, anthropology, political science, or psychology. Candidates must have completed their degree before appointment.

More information.

Deadline: December 16, 2013

Thursday, November 07, 2013

 

This Week’s Posts

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Family Farming and People-Centered Land Governance (ILC). ILC will award a small number of grants for research activities that focus on the intersection between land rights and family farming and contribute to a deeper understanding of how land governance can better respond to the needs and tap the potential of family farmers and small-scale food producers. Deadline: November 22, 2013

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Paths toward Sustainable Payments for Ecosystem Services (AAG Annual Meeting). A session at the Association of American Geographers annual meeting will cover the topic of “Paths toward Sustainable Payments for Ecosystem Services”. Deadline: November 29, 2013

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: IAIA14 Impact Assessment for Social and Economic Development. The 34th Annual Conference of the International Association for Impact Assessment will take place from 8-11 April, 2014 in Viña del Mar, Chile. Deadline: December 6, 2013

EMPLOYMENT: OECD Policy Analyst – Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment. The OECD seeks a dynamic Policy Analyst to join their Network on Gender Equality (GENDERNET) team. Deadline: open

TRAINING: Innovative Tools & Approaches for Securing Women’s Land Rights. The International Land Coalition and Procasur join efforts to identify what we can learn from others working to secure women’s land rights with a Learning Route on “Innovative tools and approaches for securing women´s land rights” in Rwanda and Burundi, to take place in February 2014. Deadline: November 25, 2013

PUBLICATIONS: Land and Agricultural Productivity in Ethiopia, 2 IFPRI Discussion Papers. Two recent IFPRI Discussion Papers present evidence on the relationship between land and agriculture in Ethiopia.

PUBLICATION: Trends and patterns of land use change and international aid in sub-Saharan Africa. A UNU-WIDER Working Paper authored by IFPRI researchers.

PUBLICATION: Transforming Gender Relations in Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa. A new book argues that there is a causal relation between more equal gender relations in the household and in the community, and better agricultural outcomes.

 

PUBLICATIONS: Land and Agricultural Productivity in Ethiopia, 2 IFPRI Discussion Papers

A couple recent IFPRI Discussion Papers present evidence on the relationship between land and agriculture in Ethiopia.

In “Efficiency and productivity differential effects of land certification program in Ethiopia,” Hosaena Ghebru Hagos and Stein Terje Holden present quasi-experimental evidence from Tigray:

Although theory predicts that better property rights to land can increase land productivity through tenure security effects (investment effects) and through more efficient input use due to enhanced tradability of the land (factor intensity effect), empirical studies on the size and magnitude of these effects are very scarce. Taking advantage of a unique quasi-experimental survey design, this study analyzes the productivity impacts of the Ethiopian land certification program by identifying how the investment effects (technological gains) would measure up against the benefits from any improvements in input use intensity (technical efficiency). For this purpose, we adopted a data envelopment analysis–based Malmquist-type productivity index to decompose productivity differences into (1) within-group farm efficiency differences, reflecting the technical efficiency effect, and (2) differences in the group production frontier, reflecting the long-term investment (technological) effects. The results show that farms without a land use certificate are, on aggregate, less productive than those with formalized use rights. We found no evidence to suggest this productivity difference is due to inferior technical efficiency. Rather, the reason is down to technological advantages, or a favorable investment effect, from which farm plots with a land use certificate benefit when evaluated against farms not included in the certification program. The low level of within-group efficiency of farms in each group reinforces the argument that certification programs need to be accompanied by complementary measures such as an improved financial and legal institutional framework in order to achieve the promised effects.

In “Land constraints and agricultural intensification in Ethiopia,” Derek Headey et al. conduct a village-level analysis of high-potential areas.

Highland Ethiopia is one of the most densely populated regions of Africa and has long been associated with both Malthusian disasters and Boserupian agricultural intensification. This paper explores the race between these two countervailing forces, with the goal of informing two important policy questions. First, how do rural Ethiopians adapt to land constraints? And second, do land constraints significantly influence welfare outcomes in rural Ethiopia? To answer these questions we use a recent household survey of high-potential areas. We first show that farm sizes are generally very small in the Ethiopian highlands and declining over time, with young rural households facing particularly severe land constraints. We then ask whether smaller and declining farm sizes are inducing agricultural intensification, and if so, how. We find strong evidence in favor of the Boserupian hypothesis that land-constrained villages typically use significantly more purchased input costs per hectare and more family labor, and achieve higher maize and teff yields and high gross income per hectare. However, although these higher inputs raise gross revenue, we find no substantial impact of greater land constraints on net farm income per hectare once family labor costs are accounted for. Moreover, farm sizes are strongly positively correlated with net farm income, suggesting that land constraints are an important cause of rural poverty. We conclude with some broad policy implications of our results.

Browse other IFPRI Discussion Papers here.

 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Family Farming and People-Centered Land Governance (ILC)

The International Land Coalition (ILC) will award a small number of grants for research activities (USD 8000) that focus on the intersection between land rights and family farming and contribute to a deeper understanding of how land governance can better respond to the needs and tap the potential of family farmers and small-scale food producers.

Research projects are expected to:

  1. Identify those land governance norms, mechanisms, institutions and practices that better respond to the needs of family farming and tap the potential of small-scale food production systems;
  2. Contribute to a better definition of family farming in specific contexts – actors, practices, needs, challenges, opportunities – for both women and men, and with an effort to capture different positions, interests, and land-related inequalities within families;

To do this, research proposals can focus on a specific country or region, and should discuss challenges, successful experiences and practical policy recommendations on one or more of the following areas:

More information.

Deadline: November 22, 2013

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

 

PUBLICATION: Transforming Gender Relations in Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa

A new book by Cathy Farnworth, Melinda Fones Sundell, Akinyi Nzioki, Violet Shivutse, and Marion Davis:

This book is based in the premise that empowered women and men are more successful farmers who are more able to make the most of the opportunities around them. It argues that there is a causal relation between more equal gender relations in the household and in the community, and better agricultural outcomes. Standard development interventions such as more extension services, better information, more fertilizer, better machinery – will not fully achieve their goals unless women and men are on equal footing and unhindered by gender norms that limit what is ‘appropriate’ from them to do or be.

Available here (pdf).

 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Paths toward Sustainable Payments for Ecosystem Services (AAG Annual Meeting)

A session at the Association of American Geographers (AAG) annual meeting will cover the topic of “Paths toward Sustainable Payments for Ecosystem Services”. The session is co-organized by Li An and Stephen Crook and will be co-chaired by Li An and Douglas Stow.

Payments for ecosystem services (PES) are direct incentives paid to resource users to take actions (or to refrain from previous actions) to secure ecosystem services such as clean air and water, food, soil fertility, forest resources, and eco-tourism.  Governments, the private sector, and many non-governmental organizations worldwide invest billions of dollars each year in PES programs. Despite reported successes in restoring and conserving ecosystems and their corresponding services, lack of sustainability has become a serious concern for many PES programs worldwide; one of the problems is that PES participants may return to their previous behavioral patterns when payments end.  

This session will explore possible pathways toward PES sustainability, addressing the complex reciprocal relationships between PES programs and corresponding socioeconomic, demographic, and environmental systems. We particularly encourage review and research articles to address theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues related to (but not limited to) the following topics:

  1. Potential mechanisms for successful (or unsuccessful) PES programs
  2. Ecological effects of PES programs (e.g., wildlife habitat or behavioral change, biodiversity change)
  3. Socioeconomic, demographic, and political consequences of PES programs
  4. Methodological issues: collection of qualitative and quantitative data related to PES, data analysis and modeling, application of GIS techniques and spatial statistics, integration of multidisciplinary and multi-scale data, and addressing complexity in PES related coupled natural and human systems (CNH). Analyses using similar integrated frameworks including coupled human and natural systems (CHANS), social-ecological systems, or social-environmental systems are also welcome.

This session (sessions) is co-sponsored by both the Spatial Analysis and Modeling group and the Human Dimensions of Global Change group. To be considered for the sessions:

  1. Please register and submit your abstract online following the AAG Guidelines(http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting); and
  2. Please send your paper title, PIN, and abstract no later than Friday, November 29 to Stephen Crook (scrook@gmail.com) and cc to Dr. Li An (lan@mail.sdsu.edu).

Deadline: November 29, 2013

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

 

PUBLICATION: Trends and patterns of land use change and international aid in sub-Saharan Africa

A UNU-WIDER Working Paper authored by IFPRI researchers.

The sub-Saharan Africa region recorded the fastest conversion of forest land to agriculture in the past 20 years. The region also has the widest yield gap and together with Latin America and Caribbean has the largest unused arable land. However, there are wide variations across countries and this offers valuable lessons on the drivers of agricultural intensification and land use dynamics. This study shows only few countries experienced a decrease in cropland extent. Additionally, few countries with low agricultural potential have shown higher actual maize yield while others with high potential have shown lower actual yield.

Available here.

 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: IAIA14 Impact Assessment for Social and Economic Development

Abstracts for both paper and poster submissions are invited through 6 December 2013.  For more information and to sign up to receive updates about this conference please visit www.iaia.org/iaia14.  IAIA conferences are interdisciplinary, and more than 800 delegates from over 80 nations are expected to attend.

The 34th Annual Conference of the International Association for Impact Assessment will take place from 8-11 April, 2014 in Viña del Mar, Chile.

During IAIA14, participants will be encouraged to discuss how the various instruments of impact assessment can assist developers, industry, decision-makers, financial institutions, development cooperation providers, and the public to integrate environmental, social, and other concerns in the following areas of interest:

More information.

Deadline: December 6, 2013

Monday, November 04, 2013

 

TRAINING: Innovative Tools & Approaches for Securing Women’s Land Rights

The International Land Coalition (ILC) and Procasur join efforts to identify what we can learn from others working to secure women’s land rights with a Learning Route on “Innovative tools and approaches for securing women´s land rights” in Rwanda and Burundi, to take place in February 2014.

The 8-day Learning Route includes a panel discussion and/or presentations from experts, meetings with government officials, field visits to community-led experiences securing women´s land rights, and group work on the case studies included in the Route to jointly extract lessons. During this unique journey through knowledge, participants will be supported by PROCASUR and Rwandese and Burundian experts in the design of an “Innovation Plan” for the adaptation and adoption of best practices in their respective settings/by their organisations.

All those working on securing women’s land rights (CSO staff, activists, researchers, representatives of development agencies, governments, and private sector) are welcome to apply.

More information.

Deadline: November 25, 2013

 

EMPLOYMENT: OECD Policy Analyst – Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment

The OECD’s Development Co-operation Directorate provides the Secretariat for the Development Assistance Committee’s (DAC) Network on Gender Equality (GENDERNET) - a community of practice which shares experiences and disseminates good practice and innovative approaches on integrating gender perspectives and women’s empowerment into key, and emerging, aspects of development co-operation.

They are seeking a dynamic Policy Analyst to join the GENDERNET team to support the Network’s efforts to:  

The position requires strong co-ordination and communication skills and extensive knowledge of gender equality and women’s empowerment in development co-operation. The chosen candidate will be familiar with international debates and thinking, including in relation to the post-2015 development agenda. S/he will have the expertise and experience to help inform wider thinking and will be sought out as a source of expertise by development actors. The successful candidate will report directly to the Principal Co-ordinator of the DAC Network on Gender Equality.

More information.

Deadline: open