Thursday, January 30, 2014

 

This Week’s Posts

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: Coordinating partners of the Land Matrix for Latin America, Asia and Eastern Europe & Central Asia. The Land Matrix partnership is issuing a call for submission for self-nominations for organisations wishing to join the Land Matrix partnership and be part of a global and independent land monitoring initiative that promotes transparency and accountability in decisions over land and investment. Deadline: February 15, 2014

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Integrated Water Resource Management. The 2014 American Water Resources Associate Summer Specialty Conference on Integrated Water Resources Management will take place on June 30 – July 2, 2014, in Reno, Nevada, USA. Deadline: February 17, 2014

TRAINING: Summer School in Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation for Complex Development Programs. This is the Ninth edition of the University of Bologna joint Centre for International Development / Department of Economics Summer Training Programme on Monitoring and Evaluation. This year the programme's focus is on Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation for Complex Development Programmes. Deadline: March 31, 2014

EMPLOYMENT: International Potato Center Value Chain/Post-harvest Specialist. The International Potato Center (CIP) and the Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas (RTB) are seeking a dynamic and innovative research professional with expertise in pro-poor market analysis, processing, and value chain development and assessment, to lead the design and implementation of a new research project that aims to expand the utilization of RTB and reduce their post-harvest losses in the countries of East and Central Africa. Deadline: open

PUBLICATION: The Local Environmental, Economic and Social Tragedies of International Interventions on Community Based Forest Management for Global Environmental Conservation. A recent paper in the Open Journal of Forestry.

PUBLICATION: FAO Case Studies on Gender and Equity Implications of Land-Related Investments. The FAO program on “Promoting gender-equitable and inclusive land-related investment policies and regulatory frameworks that contribute to enhance food security, reduce poverty and strengthen the livelihood of poor rural women and men” has produced several recent case study reports.

PUBLICATION: Women, Donors and Land Administration The Tanzania Case. A working paper from the Danish Institute of International Studies by Rasmus Hundsbæk Pedersen and Scholastica Haule.

ONLINE RESOURCE: Gender in Agriculture e-learning course. The 2008 Gender in Agriculture (GiA) Sourcebook, the result of a partnership between Michigan State University, the World Bank, FAO and IFAD, has been transformed into an e-learning course, composed of 17 modules ranging from primary production to natural resource management and climate change, access to markets and services.

 

PUBLICATION: The Local Environmental, Economic and Social Tragedies of International Interventions on Community Based Forest Management for Global Environmental Conservation: A Critical Evaluation

A recent paper in the Open Journal of Forestry:

This study reviewed the policies and outcomes of international support for forest management in Nepal and answered whether international support on forest management in developing countries resulted in positive socioeconomic and environmental outcomes at local communities. The evaluation is based on the socio-ecological theory and synergies-tradeoff model of forestry ecosystems goods and services. The study shows that the international interventions influenced national policies and community forestry practices, which contributed to the remarkable increase of forest stock. The new forestry institutions increased timber product supplies to urban users and contributed to offsetting of greenhouse gas emission of affluent societies in overseas. However, the intervention spoiled centuries of old forestry practices, which had contributed to the evolvement of socio-ecological condition, sustained local economy and environment systems. The new forestry institutions and practices locked local opportunities of multipurpose uses of forest, worsened water yield and local knowledge, and hampered local economic activities. Consequently they affected habitat diversities for forest based species, and forest resource supplies for sustaining agrobiodiversities and local food security. In reality the interventions increased benefit to distant users (urban users in the country and affluent societies in overseas) and further marginalized local communities and particularly socially disadvantaged people. The paper shows that the international forestry policies and supports are technically wrong or poorly based on science which is against their promise of providing better technical supports and benefiting local communities in developing countries. It argues that the interventions created many complexities in forestry institutions and practices which require too costly endeavor to change and address the local socioeconomic and environmental problems. The paper has explained the root cause of the international policy problem on many schools of thought.

Available here.

 

TRAINING: Summer School in Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation for Complex Development Programs

This is the Ninth edition of the University of Bologna joint Centre for International Development / Department of Economics Summer Training Programme on Monitoring and Evaluation. This year the programme's focus is on Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation for Complex Development Programmes. This is a a cutting-edge Intensive Training Course of excellence that addresses the challenges posed to planning, monitoring and evaluation (PM&E) in substantially complex development situations characterized by a changing environment and unpredictable results. In innovative projects and programs of development and social change, at the time of strategic planning often it is difficult, if not impossible, to predetermine what specific, measurable actions need to be taken or what will results will be achieved. In spite of the uncertainty, multiple, interacting actors and factors create many options for intervening, measuring and learning.
To meet this challenge, the course presents four tools and approaches delivered in two separate modules for 5 days of training, each:

More information.

Deadline: March 31, 2014

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

 

PUBLICATION: FAO Case Studies on Gender and Equity Implications of Land-Related Investments

The FAO program on “Promoting gender-equitable and inclusive land-related investment policies and regulatory frameworks that contribute to enhance food security, reduce poverty and strengthen the livelihood of poor rural women and men” has produced several recent case study reports.

All of the reports below deal with “The Gender and Equity Implications of Land-Related Investments”.

 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Integrated Water Resource Management

The 2014 American Water Resources Associate (AWRA) Summer Specialty Conference on Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) provides researchers, practitioners and academicians a forum to discuss the latest refinements in IWRM concepts, and to assess the efficacy of utilizing IWRM principles in water resources planning and management activities. The conference will take place on June 30 – July 2, 2014, in Reno, Nevada, USA.

Below is a list of the Call for Abstracts Topics and Sub-topics.

Theory and Practice of IWRM

Case Studies in IWRM

Tools for Implementing IWRM

More information.

Deadline: February 17, 2014

Monday, January 27, 2014

 

ONLINE RESOURCE: Gender in Agriculture e-learning course

The 2008 Gender in Agriculture (GiA) Sourcebook, the result of a partnership between Michigan State University, the World Bank, FAO and IFAD, has been transformed into an e-learning course, composed of 17 modules ranging from primary production to natural resource management and climate change, access to markets and services. This innovative course is intended to help agriculture specialists, practitioners and the academic community to learn how to use a gender lens in their work in order to improve development outcomes and impacts. The course is free and open to anyone interested in gender-related issues within the field of agriculture and rural development.

Available here.

 

PUBLICATION: Women, Donors and Land Administration The Tanzania Case

A working paper from the Danish Institute of International Studies by Rasmus Hundsbæk Pedersen and Scholastica Haule.

Tanzania’s land reform from 1999 has been evaluated as among the most gender-sensitive of its kind in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, there is a gap between the legal framework and what is happening on the ground. This working paper analyses the challenges related to the protection of women’s rights to land in rural areas. It provides detailed information on reform implementation experiences so far by analysing a number of government and NGO interventions. It furthermore discusses the ambiguous role of donors. The paper makes it clear that the fight for women’s rights has not been won just because the legal framework is right. Discriminatory practices persist at formal as well as customary institutions, disadvantaging women’s access to land. Women’s rights should therefore be mainstreamed into every activity that relates to land, land administration and land dispute settlement, from policy formulation over implementation to evaluation.

Available here (pdf).

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

 

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: Coordinating partners of the Land Matrix for Latin America, Asia and Eastern Europe & Central Asia

The Land Matrix partnership is issuing a call for submission for self-nominations for organisations wishing to join the Land Matrix partnership and be part of a global and independent land monitoring initiative that promotes transparency and accountability in decisions over land and investment.  The initiative supports a Global Observatory (www.landmatrix.org) as well as a number of country and thematic observatories.

The initiative is currently coordinated by CIRAD, CDE, GIGA, GIZ and ILC. It is implemented through a network of in-country partners and data coordinators. Through this call, three new partners will be considered, who will respectively coordinate the data collection and facilitate regional networks, research and communication activities for Latin America, Asia and Eastern Europe & Central Asia.

The three new partners will be responsible for collecting and managing data for countries in their region, including regular updates and quality control. For details of data collection procedures see www.landmatrix.org/about. A major aspect of this task will be facilitating a network of organisations and individuals in the region with an interest in providing data and using the dataset to inform their work.

Land Matrix partners are responsible for meeting their own financial obligations for their activities within the partnership. While joint fundraising is possible, Land Matrix partners will be expected  to be prepared to carry a large proportion of expenses themselves. Limited seed funding of up to USD15,000 for each region may be available on an as-needed basis.

More information.

Deadline: February 15, 2014

 

EMPLOYMENT: International Potato Center (CIP) Value Chain/Post-harvest Specialist

The International Potato Center (CIP) and the Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas (RTB) are seeking a dynamic and innovative research professional with expertise in pro-poor market analysis, processing, and value chain development and assessment, to lead the design and implementation of a new research project that aims to expand the utilization of RTB and reduce their post-harvest losses in the countries of East and Central Africa.

The CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas (RTB) is one of a new series of initiatives spearheaded by CGIAR to bring together the research synergies and resources of multiple agricultural research-for-development centers to improve efficiencies and increase impacts. The purpose of RTB is to tap the underutilized potential of root, tuber, and banana crops to improve food security, nutrition, and livelihoods.

This position will be based in Kampala, Uganda which is a key country in the region for RTB crops. The successful candidate will report directly to the Global Science Leader of Social and Health Sciences. The primary goal of this position is to design and implement a post-harvest and value chain (PH/VC) research strategy for Uganda with relevance for the East and Central African region. As part of this goal, the successful candidate will be expected to closely liaise and collaborate with researchers in RTB and other Research Programs with whom CIP collaborates on PH/VC issues in Africa, Asia and Latin America. This is expected to lead to substantial cross-learning between programs to reduce post-harvest losses and strengthen the development and promotion of value-adding technological/institutional/commercial innovations.

More information.

Deadline: open

Thursday, January 16, 2014

 

This Week’s Posts

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Carbon-Land-Property International Conference. The International Conference Carbon-Land-Property will be held 1-4 July 2014 at University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Deadline: February 5, 2014

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Reflections on South Africa’s Agrarian Questions after 20 years of Democracy. The Centre for African Studies at the University of Cape Town will be hosting an international workshop on 14 and 15 August 2014. Deadline: February 15, 2014

EMPLOYMENT: Agricultural Economist, The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture. IITA invites applications for the position of Agricultural Economist to undertake impact evaluation and to lead efforts aimed at tracking IITA’s contribution to poverty reduction and other development outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa. Deadline: open

EMPLOYMENT: 2 RSPB Vacancies in Liberia on Community Forest Management. RSPB is recruiting 2 positions for the "Securing Liberian forest connectivity through community forest management and innovative financing mechanisms" project. Deadline: January 20, 2014

EMPLOYMENT: Director, CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems. The CGIAR Research Program on Dryland System seeks a new Director. Deadline: January 31, 2014

EMPLOYMENT: Director, CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry. The CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry: Livelihoods, Landscapes and Governance seeks a new Director. Deadline: January 31, 2014

PUBLICATION: Biofuels Investment and Community Land Tenure in Tanzania. A recent Future Agricultures Working Paper presents a case study of Bioshape, Kilwa District.

 

PUBLICATION: Biofuels Investment and Community Land Tenure in Tanzania

A recent Future Agricultures Working Paper presents a case study of Bioshape, Kilwa District.

Like much of sub-Saharan Africa, Tanzania has experienced a surge in land-based investment during the past decade. While expanding private investment in agriculture is a core ambition of the G8’s New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition, experiences of prior investments raise questions about possible negative impacts. A notable element of this pattern of international private investment in Tanzania has been the emergence of biofuels as a form of agriculture; biofuel investments occurred rapidly and on a large scale around 2005–2008, with about four million hectares around the country requested for allocation to commercial biofuel projects. Many of those investments were large-scale projects based on the cultivation of jatropha or sugarcane, headed by European companies. One of the most well-known biofuel investments was that of Bioshape, which acquired approximately 34,000 ha in Kilwa District for the cultivation of jatropha.

The report documents, insofar as is possible using available information, the process Bioshape and government authorities at national and district level undertook to acquire the land from the four villages in Kilwa where Bioshape established operations.

Available here.

 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Reflections on South Africa’s Agrarian Questions after 20 years of Democracy

The Centre for African Studies at the University of Cape Town will be hosting an international workshop which will reflect on South Africa’s land and agrarian questions 20 years after the advent of democracy in South Africa. The workshop will be held in the Centre for African Studies gallery on 14 and 15 August 2014.

We invite scholars working on agrarian change, land reform, farm workers, rural development, social movements, trade unions, nature conservation, or eco-tourism in South Africa to submit an abstract. We specifically encourage young and upcoming scholars  with fresh empirical and/or ethnographic material to participate in this event. This includes scholars who have recently completed their PhDs and Phd students in the final stages of their project. The main objective of the workshop is to discuss and share a broad range of themes and explore how new material contributes to and refreshes mainstraim debates in contemporary agrarian scholarship.

The output of the workshop will be to publish a selection of the high quality papers presented in a special issue with a relevant academic journal. To make this possible, presenters must submit a full paper.

Why this workshop now?

After 20 years of democracy, and 20 years of market-led land reform in South Africa, land and agrarian questions remain unresolved. This in many ways is evidenced by the increasingly rising discontent among landless people and the poor; ongoing “service delivery protests”, the farm worker “uprisings” in the Western Cape, Marikana shootings, the housing struggles waged by Abahlali Basemjondolo and the emergence of former ANC Youth League President, Julius Malema and his Ecomic Freedom Fighters who are now articulating grassroots struggles demanding economic justice. These expressions of frustration and demands for social justice and transformation have been met by violent repression by the post-apartheid state and indicate the urgent need to address the process of transformation in South Africa.

In this context, South Africa’s land and agrarian questions are a relevant and timely matter. There is little doubt that post-apartheid governments have spectacularly failed to redress distorted land ownership patterns and agrarian relations that were inherited from colonialism and apartheid and continue under neo-liberal capitalism. This thus calls for reflections on ongoing debates on the meanings of land, agriculture, and land-based livelihoods in post-apartheid society. Some scholars have reduced the agrarian question to an agrarian question of labour, while others have envisaged repeasantisation as an important outcome of redistributive land reform which can address poverty. Our aim is to reflect, rethink, reconceptualise and reimagine land and agrarian questions.

We welcome papers on one or more of the following themes:

  • The state of land reform in South Africa. What are the outcomes of land reform so far (restitution, redistribution, tenure reform)? How do land beneficiaries make sense of land reform and how has it transformed their lives and the lives of those around them? We hope for contributions of local rural and urban case-studies from different regions, life histories, livelihoods, identity and belonging.
  • Processes of Agrarian change. Does South Africa have a peasantry? To what extent do land and agriculture contribute to (rural) livelihoods in South Africa? Do poor citizens want land, or jobs, or both? How do we conceptualise and think of people who combine wages, entrepreneurship, and land-based livelihoods? Nature conservation, tourism, agro-bussinesses, fair trade, organic farming.
  • Farm workers. Labour questions. Proletarianization. Organization of labour, wages, labour struggles, unions.
  • Grassroots perspectives. What is the role of social movements and NGOs in articulating and representing South Africa’s land and agrarian questions?
  • South Africa’s Democratic State. The politics of land and agriculture in national and global perspective. Policy-making debates.
  • Theory. In what ways can we articulate and think of South Africa’s agrarian questions? What theoretical questions and insights emerge from South Africa’s agrarian questions?
  • Engaged scholarship. The link between academic debates and activism (action research?!), policy formulation, issues of representation, positionality of researchers.

Deadline for Abstracts is 15 February 2014 and 1 July 2014 for the full paper. Abstracts should not be more than 300 words and papers should be within the 8000 word limit. For submission of abstracts, papers and queries, please do not hesitate to email: AgrarianQuestionsCAS2014@gmail.com

Deadline: February 15, 2014

 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Carbon-Land-Property International Conference

The International Conference Carbon-Land-Property will be held 1-4 July 2014 at University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Key questions for the conference are: Will REDD+ actually reduce greenhouse gas emissions and do we have sufficient knowledge of carbon storage in complex land use systems to be able to address this question effectively? Can implementation be monitored adequately at different scales? What governance and property regimes emerge and how do these affect notions of citizenship? And how might REDD+ and the so-called safeguards affect people’s rights, livelihoods and biodiversity?

Abstracts are invited that address the questions above under one or more of the following themes:

More information.

Deadline: February 5, 2014

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

 

EMPLOYMENT: Agricultural Economist, The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture

The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) invites applications for the position of Agricultural Economist to undertake impact evaluation and to lead efforts aimed at tracking IITA’s contribution to poverty reduction and other development outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa. As elaborated in the refreshed strategy for 2012–2020, IITA’s 2020 vision is to lift 11 million Africans out of poverty and redirect 7.5 million hectares of degraded land to more productive and sustainable use. These targets derive from the four System Level Outcomes defined by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR): reducing rural poverty, increasing food security, addressing under nutrition, and promoting more sustainable management of natural resources. As a member of the IITA Social Sciences and Agribusiness program and in collaboration with our national and international partners, the successful applicant will design and undertake impact evaluation of improved agricultural technologies and other interventions using rigorous methods in a manner that facilitates tracking of IITA’s progress toward poverty reduction goals in terms of the number of people lifted above the international poverty line.

Responsibilities:

  1. Develop and implement an operational plan for tracking IITA’s contribution to poverty reduction and other development outcomes with a detailed description of target technologies and institutional and policy innovations, geographic coverage, data requirements, methods and timing of data collection and analysis, and budgets;
  2. Build on existing qualitative and quantitative impact evaluation methods and develop extended approaches for aggregating producer and consumer benefits and quantifying the aggregate poverty impacts (i.e. number of poor moved out of poverty) of technological, institutional and policy innovations in a manner that goes beyond establishing causality and estimating average effects including methods for combining household data with general equilibrium models;
  3. Undertake and coordinate adoption and impact evaluation studies aimed at quantifying the aggregate effects of IITA interventions on poverty reduction and sustainable natural resources management;
  4. Develop and operationalize a mechanism for gathering and archiving critical feedback information and on-farm experimental data and participatory evaluation of institutional and policy interventions from IITA staff and partners involved in agricultural innovations development, dissemination and scaling out and scaling up;
  5. Establish a mechanism for providing feedback to M&E and IITA management;
  6. Publish research findings and contribute to dissemination of research results and development outcomes to stakeholders;
  7. Contribute to capacity strengthening of national partners; and
  8. Participate actively in annual review and planning meetings, resource mobilization, and contribute to strategic research planning.

More information.

Deadline: open

 

EMPLOYMENT: 2 RSPB Vacancies in Liberia on Community Forest Management

RSPB is recruiting 2 positions for the "Securing Liberian forest connectivity through community forest management and innovative financing mechanisms" project which is a new EU-funded project building on the RSPB's long-term initiative supporting the management of the Gola Rainforest National Park in Sierra Leone and the 'Across the River, a Transboundary Peace Park' project. This project marks the first step to the long-term initiative to conserve the Gola Landscape in Liberia, a global priority for biodiversity conservation.

The RSPB is seeking a Project Manager to manage the overall operational and strategic implementation of the project and a Field Research Advisor to coordinate and advise the day-to-day field operations and implementation. Both positions are based in Liberia.

More information on the Project Manager position.

More information on the Field Research Advisor position.

Deadline: January 20, 2014

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

 

EMPLOYMENT: Director, CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems

The CGIAR Research Program seeks a new Director:

The Dryland Systems Research Program is a major new effort to speed up the identification, testing, and delivery of solutions to increase food and nutrition security, and improve livelihoods in the world’s most fragile agro-ecosystems.

Current reductionist, piecemeal, and single-dimension research approaches to improve agriculture in low-income countries are no longer effective. If you share this feeling and are a dynamic manager who has produced and led innovative research on agriculture and livelihoods in dryland systems, we encourage you to apply to this challenging senior position.

The Dryland Systems Program starts in 2012. Its integrated agro-ecosystems approach should develop research to produce solutions to benefit low income countries and their rural communities. It combines knowledge from applied research using the latest innovation system approaches, communication and knowledge sharing strategies, and tools.

The Program’s new thinking and findings will be harnessed to create measurable, sustainable, and large scale impact on rural livelihoods. The Program has a growing annual budget of over $40 Million. Details are available at: http://www.icarda.org/dryland_systems/teaser and http://drylandsystems.cgiar.org/

Your Role

As the Director of the Dryland Systems Program, you will be working closely with partners and stakeholders to develop the research portfolio to achieve clearly defined results of the Program. This involves coordinating the inputs and results of the work of implementation multi-disciplinary teams, and effective management of partnerships. Project management and building of an extensive network of collaborators and partners are critical success factors.

Your Responsibilities

As the Director of the Program, you report directly to the Director General of ICARDA, the Center leading the Program. You will:

  • Ensure effective and efficient implementation of the Program to achieve its objectives meeting qualitative and quantitative standards and ensure timely and high quality reporting on the Program.
  • Coordinate the inputs of implementation teams in the targeted regions.
  • Lead resource mobilization efforts.
  • Ensure scientific excellence and global influence of the Program.
  • Ensure effective partnerships with research and development partners.
  • Represent the Program globally to ensure high visibility and to create positive views of investors, stakeholders, and the public.

More information.

Deadline: January 31, 2014

 

EMPLOYMENT: Director, CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry

The CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry: Livelihoods, Landscapes and Governance (FTA) is a large integrated research program that started in 2011. It is responding to the call for urgent, strong and sustained effort focused on forest management and governance, given the crucial role of forests in some of the most important challenges of our time: climate change, poverty, environment and food security.

The FTA brings together several hundred scientists from four CGIAR Centers: CIFOR, the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Bioversity International and International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), two non-CGIAR organizations (CIRAD and CATIE), as well as many other research and non-research partners. The program was initiated in 2011 with a ten-year horizon. The 2014 budget is US$89 million.

The FTA is led by CIFOR, which hosts the Management Support Unit, headed by the Director of FTA. For further information about FTA, see: www.cifor.org/forests-trees-agroforestry

Summary of responsibilities

  1. Provide intellectual leadership in building a shared vision for the FTA research agenda and impact pathways with a strategic perspective through which research outcomes lead to the achievement of long-term impacts.
  2. Coordinate, monitor and support the work of FTA theme coordinators and focal points.
  3. Facilitate and oversee the delivery of research outputs and contributions towards outcomes and impacts across themes in the program.
  4. Coordinate FTA work plans, budgets, reporting, monitoring and evaluation, including working closely with the Consortium Office, Independent Evaluation Arrangement, Independent Science and Partnership Council and other CGIAR or related institutions.

With guidance from CIFOR’s Deputy Director General for Research and the FTA Steering Committee, the Director of FTA will be responsible for the following:

Management of FTA planning, budgeting, reporting, monitoring and evaluation

Leadership and support to science and impact orientation

Coordination and outreach

More information.

Deadline: January 31, 2014

Thursday, January 09, 2014

 

This Week’s Posts

CALL FOR PAPERS: Water for Food. The Future of Food: Journal on Food, Agriculture and Society, an open access online academic journal for young scholars, researchers, practitioners and post graduate students, calls for research papers for an issue on the theme of “Water for Food”. Deadline (full papers): January 30, 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS: Conference on India’s National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme. The three day event will be held on 26-28 March in Mumbai and aims to bring together scholars working on assessing the impacts of MGNREGA along a number of dimensions, including human well-being, environmental resources, labour markets and agriculture. Deadline: January 20, 2014

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS)-DFG Cooperation Visits. The program provides postdoctoral researchers from sub-Saharan Africa (excluding South Africa) with the opportunity to make a ‘Cooperation Visit’ to an institute in Germany of no more than 3 months. Deadline: March 31, 2014

EMPLOYMENT: Postdoctoral position on adaptive governance: water, land use and climate change in an urbanizing agricultural region. A two-year researcher position is available with the Water Sustainability and Climate (WSC) research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison as part of a five-year project funded by the National Science Foundation. Deadline: January 13, 2014

EMPLOYMENT: IIED Senior Researcher. The successful candidate will be responsible for managing and developing a set of research and communication activities on behalf of IIED and the Independent Research Forum and leading IIED support for the Independent Expert Group of Least Developed Country thinkers, to generate evidence and ideas for the post-2015 and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) processes. Deadline: January 13, 2014

EMPLOYMENT: Researcher - Land Rights and Agro-food Systems in Southern Africa. The Institute for Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies (PLAAS) invites applications from suitably qualified and experienced persons for a one-year renewable contract post, starting as soon as possible. Deadline: January 24, 2014

PUBLICATION: Gender inequalities in ownership and control of land in Africa: Myth versus reality. A new IFPRI Discussion Paper explores the levels and relative inequalities in landownership between women and men in African countries and revisits many of the oft-repeated claims and statistics on this topic.

PUBLICATION: Land administration, gender equality and development cooperation. A new report from the Danish Institute of International Studies.

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

 

PUBLICATION: Gender inequalities in ownership and control of land in Africa: Myth versus reality

A new IFPRI Discussion Paper explores the levels and relative inequalities in landownership between women and men in African countries and revisits many of the oft-repeated claims and statistics on this topic.

Over the past decade, stakeholders have made a variety of generalized claims concerning women’s landownership, both globally and in Africa. Typically, these claims include statements with single statistics, such as “women own less than 2 percent of the world’s land” or “women own approximately 15 percent of land in Africa south of the Sahara.” These claims are problematic because they are not substantiated by empirical evidence, do not reflect variations in landownership across or within countries, do not acknowledge differences in landownership regimes, nor address comparative ownership by men in the same contexts. Neither do they address the difference between ownership and control of land. The lack of a clear understanding behind statistics on gender and land also leads to an inability to clearly articulate a policy response to the potential inequalities faced by women and men. The objective of this paper is to explore, conceptually and empirically, the levels and relative inequalities in landownership between women and men in African countries. The first section of the paper engages in a conceptual discussion of how to measure gendered land outcomes, what ownership and control mean in different contexts, and why attention to these factors is important for the development of gender and land statistics. The second section of the paper systematically reviews existing evidence from microlevel large sample studies by region to summarize recent trends in land access, ownership, and control by sex. The third section presents new statistics from a variety of nationally representative and large-scale unpublished data on gender and land in Africa. Results provide not only a nuanced understanding of the importance of measuring land indicators for gendered development in Africa and globally but also new statistics on a variety of land outcomes to aid stakeholders in the discussion of gender-land inequalities.

Available here.

 

EMPLOYMENT: Postdoctoral position on adaptive governance: water, land use and climate change in an urbanizing agricultural region

A two-year postdoctoral researcher position is available with the Water Sustainability and Climate (WSC) research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison as part of a five-year project funded by the National Science Foundation. The position requires strong social science training and ability to couple social research with ecological and hydrologic sciences. The researcher will have the opportunity to work with an excellent interdisciplinary research group (wsc.limnology.wisc.edu).

This position will investigate the processes of environmental governance that shape human-environment interactions in the Yahara Watershed of southern Wisconsin. The WSC project features an integrated model and scenario development process to compare alternative futures for the watershed. Postdoctoral research:

  1. First, the postdoctoral researcher will analyze governance processes and decision-making under uncertainty in the context of climatic, environmental, and social change. This research will examine decision-making processes with past and modeled future ecological conditions in the Yahara Watershed. The researcher will examine the role of governance in scenarios and identify how modeled future nonstationarity in water, land use, agriculture, and climate may challenge existing governance regimes. The researcher will also compare theories of change.
  2. Second, the researcher will examine stakeholder engagement with the scenarios. We are interested in knowing whether engagement with scenarios by local stakeholders can alter perceptions and decision horizons and expand a space for creative thinking. The scenarios are provocative, plausible, place-based stories with contrasting social and biophysical conditions through year 2070.
  3. (optional) Depending on the applicant’s skillset, there may be an opportunity to continue developing a spatial dataset of policy interventions in the watershed to understand the role of different organizations (municipal, county, state, and federal agencies and nonprofit organizations) deploying different tools (acquisitions, regulations, incentives, etc.) to improve water quality.

The postdoc will work closely with an interdisciplinary team spanning social, ecological, and hydrologic scientists. The project involves six faculty, two full-time staff members, and numerous graduate and undergraduate students. The overarching question of our work is:  How will ecosystem services related to freshwater vary and how can they be sustained in regional watersheds as climate, land use and land cover, land management, the built environment and human demands change? As a part of this overarching question, we ask: How can regional governance systems for water and land use be made more resilient and adaptive to meet diverse human needs? In what ways are regional human-environment systems resilient and in what ways are they vulnerable to potential changes in climate and freshwaters? The geographic setting for this project is the Yahara Watershed, an urbanizing agricultural watershed in southern Wisconsin, containing the city of Madison. Here and elsewhere, human needs for freshwater are growing as changes in climate, landscapes, the built environment and institutions alter water flows and quality in sometimes unpredictable ways. These changes affect ecosystem services related to freshwater, such as flows of freshwater for domestic, agricultural, industrial, recreational and other uses; regulation of floods; water quality; and aspects of human health. To strengthen conceptual frameworks and improve predictive capacity, our interdisciplinary project will integrate biophysical and social-economic aspects of regional water systems. The position will also benefit from connections with the North Temperate Lakes - Long Term Ecological Research site and network.

Applicants should have strong social science training with a prior degree in human dimensions of natural resources, geography, political science, planning, environmental policy, or related field.  Background in water quality and quantity, agriculture, and/or land use change required. Previous social science research experience and ability to conduct interdisciplinary research are required. Experience with mixed qualitative and quantitative research methods is desired; ArcGIS and spatial analysis is desired but optional. Strong GPA, GRE scores, and oral and written communication skills are required. Applicants bringing diverse personal and professional backgrounds to the research program are encouraged to apply. The position will be co-supervised by Drs. Adena Rissman and Chris Kucharik.

The 2-year Postdoctoral Research position will begin in Summer 2014. Review of applications will begin January 13, 2014 and continue until an applicant is selected.

To apply, email to Dr. Adena Rissman at arrissman@wisc.edu the following in a single PDF document: cover letter, CV with undergraduate/graduate GPA and GRE scores, and unofficial undergraduate/graduate transcripts.

Deadline: January 13, 2014

Tuesday, January 07, 2014

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Water for Food

The Future of Food: Journal on Food, Agriculture and Society is a multidisciplinary, peer reviewed and open access online academic journal for young scholars, researchers, practitioners and post graduate students. The journal is scheduled to publish two times a year (summer and winter). The journal is currently calling for research papers for the Volume 2, Issue 1 in May 2014 on the theme of “Water for Food”.

More information.

Deadline (full papers): January 30, 2014

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Conference on India’s National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme

The conference aims to bring together scholars working on assessing the impacts of the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA) in India, to take stock of the impacts of the programme along a number of dimensions, including but not restricted to human well-being, environmental resources, labour markets and agriculture. The three day event will be held on 26-28 March, 2014, at IGIDR, Mumbai, India.

The organizers invite submissions that contain new research ideally addressing one of the following themes

  1. Theorizing Rural Employment Guarantee
  2. Targeting, Implementation, and Accountability including the impact of ICTs and social audits
  3. Impact on participants with respect to income, financial inclusion, labour supply and migration decisions, agricultural productivity and cultivation practices, education, nutrition, etc.
  4. Spillover effects on labour markets and wages, asset creation and their impacts, empowerment, inequality, and gender.

More information.

Deadline: January 20, 2014

Monday, January 06, 2014

 

PUBLICATION: Land administration, gender equality and development cooperation

A new report from the Danish Institute of International Studies:

Most land reforms seek to enhance tenure security, encourage investments and thus promote economic growth. In addition, recent land reforms increasingly also attempt to secure women’s and other vulnerable groups’ access to land. This DIIS Report examines the role of development cooperation in land reforms and the extent to which donor organisations have addressed concerns related to gender equality.

The report reviews the reforms in fifteen countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and Asia, with a focus on Ghana, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Nicaragua. Donor organisations have played an important role in land law reforms but also in related legal reforms such as succession law or marriage law, which have an important impact on women’s access to and ownership of land. Legislation upholding gender equality is now present, albeit in different degrees, in most of the countries examined. However, the implementation of these legislative frameworks often does not follow suit, and women still face discrimination, in part due to social and cultural barriers and the inaccessibility of institutions able to support them. Moreover, gender concerns are also increasingly ‘evaporating’ in development cooperation policies. This is illustrated by the limited funding allocated to gender issues outside the ‘soft’ sectors of health and education and the weak implementation of gender mainstreaming in policies. The current inadequacy of gender-disaggregated data both in development cooperation and in national statistics e.g. on issues related to land tenure hampers efforts to effectively address issues related to gender equality and should therefore be corrected.

Available here (pdf).

 

EMPLOYMENT: Researcher - Land Rights and Agro-food Systems in Southern Africa

The Institute for Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies (PLAAS) invites applications from suitably qualified and experienced persons for a one-year renewable contract post, starting as soon as possible. The successful candidate will join a committed, motivated and vibrant team doing quality scholarly research aimed at influencing policy processes in Southern Africa and elsewhere. S/he will be responsible for playing a leading role in fieldwork across several countries on land and agrarian reform, large-scale commercial land acquisitions (‘land grabbing’) and farm investment, smallholder development, and pro-poor inclusive growth. S/he will be required to travel fairly extensively.

More information.

Deadline: January 24, 2014

 

EMPLOYMENT: IIED Senior Researcher

The successful candidate will be responsible for managing and developing a set of research and communication activities on behalf of IIED and the Independent Research Forum (IRF2015); and leading IIED support for the Independent Expert Group of Least Developed Country (LDC) thinkers, to generate evidence and ideas for the post-2015 and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) processes.

To succeed in this role you will have a postgraduate degree or equivalent in a relevant discipline and a good understanding of current research and practice on international development and sustainability. You will also have significant experience of working with a global network; of acquiring, analysing and synthesising research for a variety of audiences; and experience of managing multiple projects.

More information.

Deadline: January 13, 2014